problackgirl:

some kinks are disgusting

some kinks are racist

just bcs something can cause you sexual arousal, it doesn’t make it any less disgusting.

people have every right to kink shame your racist as fuck “kinks”

raceplay is disgusting

hardlighthologram:

gimptips:

tkleek013:

Anyone wanna do a fill in the blank? My life as _______ #waitwhat #kidstoys #wheelchair #lol #walmart #toysection

representation is important. this toy is important. the people who play with them are important.

People have no idea how much having medical stuff for my dolls helped me when I was younger. I have two doll wheelchairs, a Build-A-Bear “get well” set, a bald 18” ‘Sew Able’ doll (at one point between the hair thinning, scalp pain, and inability to lift my arms to care for my hair, my hair had to be cut to 1-2 inches long, and having that doll helped so much), a couple sets of Build-A-Bear scrubs, and my dolls and bears had germ masks. When I started aquatic therapy, my Sew Able doll got a swimsuit, too. She wore long sleeves to protect from the sun, just like me. Representation means so much to kids and the adults they will become.

Here are my favorite sources for inclusive dolls and bears:

  • Here’s a link to Sew Dolling’s "Sew Able" dolls and physical therapy and mobility equipment. They come with/without hair, with/without prosthesis, etc., and they are the same price (and better quality, IMHO) as American Girl dolls! They have a boy doll, as well!
  • Here's some Build-A-Bear stuff, too.
  • Here's a couple 18” doll outfits from Emily Rose (less $$ than AG, better quality and customer service, IMHO).
  • American Girl dolls can now come with/without hair and with/without hearing aids (however, they don’t come with wigs like the Sew Able dolls). Casts, crutches, and wheelchairs are also for sale.
  • Feel free to add more!

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

…to any teenage boys out there who might be reluctant to read about girls or books written by women: What are you afraid of? The worst thing that could happen is you’ll discover that girls are people too, and not necessarily all that different from you. The best thing you’ll learn is how you can act like a decent person, so girls might not mind talking to you. They might even say yes when you ask them out. They might ask you out, and you should be cool with that. Another boy might ask you out, and that could be cool too. Maybe you want to say yes. Look, there are no “boy books” or “girl books,” there are only good books and bad books. Seriously, go read some Judy Blume. You’ll thank me later.
E.C. Myers from Confessions of a Male YA Author (and author of the smart sci-fi Fair Coin)

(Source: brkteenlib)

We are part of a generation that gobbles down headlines without ever reading the story. Headline wording is extremely important. If I am about to read an article that’s titled “Ferguson Calm Until Bottles Fly” that would lead me to believe I’m about to read about how a flying bottle broke the peace. Even though this was the headline, the article never once mentioned a bottle. What does that tell me as a thinking person? The sole purpose of that headline was to cast a negative light on a peaceful protest that I witnessed with my own eyes. The purpose was to make people think that a militarized police presence is justified. Who else can stop dangerous water bottles? It shifts the narrative from “police should not be executing the unarmed citizens they are sworn to protect” to “maybe people should stop throwing things at police.” That article was grossly unfair to the community of Ferguson.

humoristics:

a guy once told my lesbian friend that being a lesbian is a huge turn off for guys and that she’ll never find a boyfriend.

‘Men get raped and molested,’ should be a whole sentence. If you have to tack on the word ‘too,’ then you’re using the experience of male victims to silence females instead of giving them their own space.

(via goldenphoenixgirl)

Not sure if I’ve reblogged this before but it always bears repeating.

(via thebicker)

(Source: theresalwaysalwayssomething)

When you shame a person for mental illness, for attempting or completing suicide, what you’re doing is trying to make yourself comfortable at their expense. When you say, “Think of the people you will hurt,” you’re saying, “THINK OF MY COMFORT!” But most of the people I’ve known who’ve struggled with mental illness have already done that, and it didn’t work. We’ve already thought of you. We’ve already done the volunteer work. We’ve already found new hobbies. We’ve looked at the greeting cards we’ve saved from family and the letters from lovers. It’s not that we don’t know. It’s that none of it helps. And you think… You think, “Who’s the more selfish? Me, for wanting not to have to live in this pain? Or you, for insisting I do to spare you?”

Let’s play out the scenario for the one in millions chance that someone in the presence of someone who wants to assault her is wearing the nail polish, coyly gets her finger into the drink, and spots the color change. Then what? How does it end? If this person is willing to go to such lengths to harm her, they won’t be phased by her setting her drink down. So let’s say she gets away or finds help. Does she call the police to report the activity of her fingernails? What happens when the next person this predator wants to harm opts for her favorite OPI shade that weekend?

How does it end?

It doesn’t; not with nail polish, anyway.

(…)This product does nothing to dismantle a culture of violence against women that demands we constantly become ever more vigilant against those who would do us harm. Undercover Colors, like so many other products, treats rape as an individual incident rather than a systemic and pervasive problem. Despite the never ending stream of prevention products, the statistics haven’t improved.

Unfortunately, This Magical Anti-Rape Nail Polish Won’t Save Us

(x)

(Source: safercampus)

az-zawraq:

asexualklepto:

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my friend lauren & i collaborated on a powerpoint on psychosis, including some definitions, a list of slurs/derogatory terms, some media depictions of psychosis, a short list of tips on being a friend to someone with psychosis, disorders where people experience psychosis, etc. since we couldn’t find another one on tumblr

:)